Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Category Archive: Nature

Swordfish – live torpedo

Swordfish – live torpedo

Swordfish – live torpedo


The fantastic speed of a swordfish is still a mystery to scientists.
At the very end of World War II, the British tanker Barbara sailed on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. The weather was calm. And suddenly the sailor on duty noticed that a long torpedo was flying at a huge speed right toward the tanker, leaving a foamy mark on the surface of the ocean. The sailor raised the alarm, but after a few moments the torpedo had already reached its target, hit the tanker, but … there was no explosion. And the “torpedo” quickly turned around and again rushed at the ship. It turned out that it was a swordfish. At the second attempt to ram the ship, the fish broke its weapon – a sword, and was stuck in a hole. When the aggressive fish was pulled out onto the deck, it turned out that the length of the sword exceeded one and a half meters, the body was five meters, and the weight of the live torpedo was 660 kilograms.
More »

Wonderful Bumblebee

Wonderful Bumblebee

Wonderful Bumblebee


The bumblebee family, as well as the wasp family, exists only one summer. In spring, the queen begins to look for a place for a nest. An abandoned mouse mink, a moss bump, a hollow, a squirrel’s nest, a birdhouse, are all suitable for this purpose. Having covered the nest with dry grass or moss on the outside, the queen makes the first round wax cell inside. In the cell, she places a small supply of food — a mixture of flower pollen and honey — and makes several eggs. Then she builds the others. Meanwhile, in the first cell, the larvae hatch. When they eat the food supply, the female gnaws a hole in the cell through which she feeds them.
After a week and a half or two weeks, the larvae begin to weave silk cocoons and turn into pupae. Then small working bumblebees are born and they begin working immediately – build cells and feed the larvae.
More »

Rose inspired festivals

Rose inspired festivals

Rose inspired festivals. Portland Floral Carnival


The queen of flowers, Rose is celebrated in many countries, it is the subject of worship and fervent love. Rose inspired festivals are held in Moldova, Mordovia, Estonia, Spain, Venice, etc. Since ancient times, the rose has been the object of worship and admiration. The earliest information about the rose can be found in ancient legends: it was enjoyed in ancient India at such high level that even existed a law according to which everyone who brought a rose to the king, could ask him for anything he desired. In Bulgaria rose is given in special honor, and it is one of the main symbols of the country.
More »

Green River traditions

Green River traditions

Green River traditions. Green River of Wyoming. Painting by Thomas Moran (February 12, 1837 – August 25, 1926)


The River of green color begins its flow in the western Wyoming going south to Utah, where it turns east to make a loop through the northwestern corner of Colorado. Turning south in Utah, it enters the Colorado river in Canyonlands National Park after a course of 730 mi (1,175 km). Originally known as the Spanish River, it was renamed in 1824, probably for its distinctive color. There are several Holidays and traditions connected with the Green river, among them – Green River Rendezvous and Flaming Gorge Days.
More »

Spruce Cones colors

Spruce Cones colors

Spruce Cones colors. Korean spruce cones are blue, and only to mature color thickens, becoming almost black


Spruce Cones colors. Korean Spruce medium-sized evergreen young tree has thin, yellow, yellowish-red or yellowish-brown cones; as they grow they become darker, up to three years – a reddish-brown or gray-brown. Winter conical buds are reddish-brown, conical-ovoid, slightly resinous. Needles are green, with a bluish tinge, tetrahedral, 1.2-2.2 cm long, 1.5-1.8 mm wide, with sharp or blunt ends, with two – four white strips. Korean spruce cones are blue, but the official biological reference stipulate that its cones are black, but the young plants cones have blue and blue-violet colors, and only to mature color thickens, becoming almost black.
More »

Red river phenomenon

Red river phenomenon

Red river phenomenon. The Yangtze River – the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world


Red river phenomenon has been seen repeatedly – in Canada, China, the US, and in other places of our planet. Rivers, rains, lakes and seas spontaneously turn blood-red, like in the above photo – when abundant rains painted Cameron Falls River red. The phenomenon was captured by a couple of tourists who arrived in the Canadian province of Alberta. Precipitation washed natural pigment of the river in the rocks where the river originates, which gave the water a rich red color. Within two hours, the water flow changed its color.
More »

Charming pink heather

Charming pink heather

Charming Pink Heather. Wicklow Mountains, Great Britain


Charming pink heather in the house – the happiness for the whole year, the British say. In Celtic folklore, heather is a symbolic plant. Common in Ireland and Britain, the low-growing heath or heather is a tough bog plant that blooms with charming pink or purplish flowers that carpet wild areas in summer. Bees love heather and make from it a honey that is a favorite food in parts of Scotland. In Ireland heather was classed as a “peasant” tree, but it nonetheless is included in the tree alphabet.
In England, heather grows in the vicinity of windy ocean coast. It is said that the sight of blooming, billowing in the wind and the sun shimmering on the heath helps get rid of depression and bad mood.
More »