Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Category Archive: Nature

Iris – graceful and amazing flower

Iris - graceful and amazing flower

Iris – graceful and amazing flower

Irises are popular garden flowers. They are known for their wide variety of colors and unique petal shapes. There are about 800 species of iris. They grow mostly in mild northern regions. Some irises grow from bulbs. Others grow from the rhizomes of other iris plants.
Irises have six petals that can be white, yellow, pink, red, blue, purple, brown, or even black. Irises can grow to 90 centimeters tall and usually have a strong fragrance.
Irises are known since ancient times. One of the frescoes found in Crete shows a priest surrounded by irises. The fresco is about 4,000 years old.
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Mimicry – Protective Coloration

Mimicry - Protective Coloration

Mimicry – Protective Coloration

Mimicry may be defined as imitation or copying of an action or image. It helps animals and plants in various ways: keep them from being eaten or help them get food.
The fly orchid is a type of plant whose flower looks like a fly. This helps the plant attract real flies to pollinate it.
Some animals use mimicry to prey on other creatures. The tongue of the alligator snapping turtle looks like a worm. The turtle lies in water with its mouth open. When fish come over to get the “worm,” the turtle eats them.
The eggs of the European cuckoo look like the eggs of other birds. So, host parents incubate cuckoo’s eggs as their own.
Passionflower plants sometimes grow little lumps that look like butterfly eggs. So, the plant protests itself from being eaten by the caterpillars that would develop from the real eggs.
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Echidna – unusual animal

Echidna – unusual animal

Echidna – unusual animal

Echidna is an unusual mammal. They are the only living mammals (along with their relative the platypus) that lay eggs. These animals are also called spiny ant-eaters. They are found only in Australia, New Guinea and the islands located in the Bass Strait.
There are three species of echidna. The short-nosed echidna is common in Australia and on the island of Tasmania. Two species of long-nosed echidna live only on the island of New Guinea.
Echidnas have brownish fur with spines. Their feet have strong claws that are good for digging. They have a long, sticky tongue. Echidnas have no teeth.
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Interesting facts about Cuckoos

Interesting facts about Cuckoos

Interesting facts about Cuckoos

Cuckoos are named for the sounds they make. There are more than 125 different types of cuckoos throughout the world. Most of them live in forests, others live in open areas. Most cuckoos eat insects, especially caterpillars. Some of the larger species of cuckoos also feed on lizards, snakes, small mammals, and other birds.
The cuckoos vary greatly in size, with the range of body length being about 16–70 cm. Most of them are gray or brown. A few types have brightly colored feathers.
Some kinds of cuckoos do not raise their own young. They are nest-parasites and lay eggs in the nests of other kinds of birds that have similar-looking eggs. The female cuckoo may also remove any pre-existing eggs of the host species. In most cases, the host species is much smaller than the parasite and it is quite difficult to feed the voracious young cuckoo. The young cuckoo hatches quite quickly and while still blind, deaf and completely naked ejects the unhatched eggs of the host from the nest.
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Beautiful and Unusual Nests

Beautiful and Unusual Nests

Beautiful and Unusual Nests

Birds are well known for building nests for their eggs. Some fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and insects also build nests. Some fish hollow out nests in underwater gravel or sand. Frogs make nests out of mud or hardened froth. Alligators build mounds of grasses and mud. Cobras push together nests of leaves. Rabbits, mice, moles, and gophers make their nests underground.
Birds build nests in trees, in bushes, in caves, on buildings, on the ground or underground. They use a wide range of building materials: twigs and grass, mud, feathers, plant fuzz, and bits of spiderweb. Some birds use their saliva to bind the materials together.
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Crane – beautiful wading bird

Crane - beautiful wading bird

Crane – beautiful wading bird

Cranes are tall, wading birds known for their courtship dances, and voices. Today there are 15 crane species throughout the world, except South America and Antarctica.
Cranes have long legs, a long neck, and a narrow, tapered bill. They eat grains, and invertebrates they catch in the water.
Most cranes migrate fairly long distances to their nesting sites.
The largest crane, and the rarest Asian crane, is the red-crowned, or Japanese, crane. It can weigh up to 11.4 kg. It has vivid red feathers on the top of its head, but its body is snowy white. In 1952, this crane became Japan’s national bird.
The smallest crane is the demoiselle crane of Europe and North Africa.
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Daisy – pearl among plants

Daisy - pearl among plants

Daisy – pearl among plants

Daisies belong to the aster family, which also includes chrysanthemums, dahlias, marigolds, sunflowers, and zinnias.
Daisies grow in Europe, North America, and other parts of the world. Common types of daisy include the Dakar oxeye daisy, the English daisy, and the Shasta daisy.
These plants often grow to about 61 to 91 centimeters tall and their flowers can be white, purple, pink, or red.
Daisy protects the queen of the garden, rose, and a lush jasmine from the invasion of aphids.
Daisy translated from Greek as pearl.
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