Google+

Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Category Archive: It’s interesting

Giants of wind energy

Giants of wind energy

Giants of wind energy

A windmill is a machine that harnesses the power of the wind. It may be used to grind grain into flour, to pump water, or to produce electricity.
The blades are mounted on a tall tower and spin around when wind blows on them. Blades are connected to a vertical shaft, which powers, for example, a water pump or millstones.
People in western Asia built the earliest known windmills more than 1,000 years ago. They spread to Europe by the 1100s. By the 1800s, however, many people used steam engines rather than wind power.
Today wind turbines produce electricity for many communities.
More »

Easter Island – Land of Giants

Easter Island - Land of Giants

Easter Island – Land of Giants


Easter Island is located in the eastern part of the Pacific Ocean. Today it is a part of Chile. The people who live on the island call it Rapa Nui. The first European visitors were the Dutch and they named it Paaseiland, meaning “Easter Island”, because they arrived there on Easter Sunday.
The island is only 14 miles long and 7 miles wide. It is world famous for its huge stone statues, moai. There are more than 600 moai that were carved after about AD 700. Many people believe that the statues honored important people who were revered as gods after their death. The statues average about 13 feet in height, 5 feet in width, and weigh an average of 14 tons.
More »

Extinct animals – silent reproach to mankind

The Caspian tiger disappeared in 1970

The Caspian tiger disappeared in 1970

Once a species becomes extinct, it is gone forever. The most common cause of extinction is a sudden, serious change in a species’ habitat. Floods, fires, droughts, volcanoes, and other natural events may be causes. People also change the environment: clear forests and drain wetlands, build cities on land that animals need to survive and create harmful pollution. Some species have been hunted to extinction.
Dinosaurs first appeared on Earth about 215 million years ago. By 65 million years ago, however, they had died out. Many scientists believe that a large asteroid caused this mass extinction. It hit Earth and thick dust blocked the sun. The dinosaurs could not survive the cold temperatures. But early species of birds and mammals did survive.
More »

Mercury – first of eight planets

Mercury - first of eight planets

Mercury – first of eight planets

Mercury is the first of eight planets and the smallest one. It is the closest planet to the Sun. It was named for the wing-footed Roman god. Mercury is visible to the naked eye from Earth. Mercury will either set within two hours of sunset, or rise no earlier than two hours before the Sun.
It is only slightly bigger than Earth’s Moon. Many different gases surround the planet. It has a very thin atmosphere of oxygen, potassium, and sodium vapors.
Planet’s hottest temperature is 400° C during a Mercurian day and its coldest is -173° C during a Mercurian night. This temperature variation is due to the fact that Mercury has essentially no insulating atmosphere.
More »

Coelacanth – Latimeria chalumnae

Coelacanth - Latimeria chalumnae

Coelacanth – Latimeria chalumnae

Biologists call the coelacanth a “living fossil”. This fish is the only living member of an order that was abundant 80,000,000 to 370,000,000 years ago.
The coelacanth grows to a length of 1.5 meters and can weigh up to 68 kilograms. It feeds on lantern fish, cuttlefish, and other reef fish.
A female coelacanth does not lay eggs, but gives birth to fully formed young after a gestation period of over 12 months. The female keeps the eggs inside her body to protect them. It gives birth to 5-26 offspring at a time. Young coelacanths probably live in caves and hunt at night.
More »

Unicorn – mystical beast or real creature

Unicorn – mystical beast or real creature

Unicorn – mystical beast or real creature

At the end of 2012, the North Korean news agency (only one in the country) made a strange statement, even for North Korea, that state archaeologists discovered a unicorn lair in the north of the country. According to the Koreans, the unicorn was a domestic animal of the ancient Korean king. The structure dates back 918-1392 AD (Kingdom of Korea). Nothing surprising in the news, archaeologists do their work, find antiquities. The main “but” is that unicorns never existed. The Guardian managed to find out that this was a subtle Sesame-Korean irony. Nevertheless, the message became an indicator of how firmly the myth of unicorns penetrated into the cultural code of the inhabitants of both Asia and Europe.
If you dig deep into the myth, the first documented mention of the unicorn was the epic Natural History of the Roman naturalist Pliny, written in 77 AD. The book was the first attempt to classify all living beings that lived on the planet. Pliny did not check the facts and included not only those animals that he saw with his own eyes, but also those about whom he was told. So, the unicorn came to the pages of a serious scientific publication.
More »

Soaring coffins

Soaring coffins

Soaring coffins

Wooden coffins hanging on the rocks are a scary view. However, this method of burial is known since ancient times in China.
High in the mountains, among the rocks there are coffins – the only reminder of the mysterious and almost disappeared people who lived in the south-western part of modern China. Bo people had always remained an ethnic minority of the populous country. But, despite this, they managed to create a bright original culture, which would develop further if it was not bloody war with the Ming Dynasty.
What made people to have such a strange tradition? How did they lift coffins, weighing up to 200 kilograms, 100-200 meters high?
More »

Page 10 of 27« First...89101112...20...Last »