Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Category Archive: It’s interesting

Scientology – what is it?

Scientology – what is it?

Scientology – what is it?

Scientology is a complex set of beliefs that combines a religious and church-like structure with a set of unique techniques for personal and spiritual development. It is probably the most widespread and well-known New Religious Movement founded in the 20th Century.
Many critics don’t consider Scientology to be a religion at all.
Scientology was founded by Layafette Ron Hubbard (1911 – 86), a science-fiction writer. Hubbard possessed two doctorate degrees, was a naval commander and war hero and was a noted international explorer. But critics claim that the degrees were of the mail-order variety; he was only ever in command of a small naval escort vessel and tales of his exploring exploits were much exaggerated.
Scientology began as Dianetics – Hubbard’s theory of the mind and mental health. It was published in 1950 in the periodical Amazing Science Fiction.
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Rhythm and Blues

Rhythm and Blues

Rhythm and Blues


Rhythm and blues (also known as R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences, first performed by African American artists.
Contemporary R&B is a music genre of American popular music, the current iteration of the genre that began in the 1940s as rhythm and blues music. Although the acronym “R&B” originates from its association with traditional rhythm and blues music, the term R&B is today most often used to define a style of African American music originating after the demise of disco in the 1980s.
R&B laid the groundwork for rock & roll.
Rhythm and Blues was the urban popular black music of the 1940s and 1950s. It used small-group jazz instrumentation, centered on piano and saxophone as often as on guitar. Billboard magazine first used the term ‘Rhythm and Blues’ as the title for its black music charts in 1949, replacing ‘‘race music.’’
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Right and Left Handedness

Right and Left Handedness

Right and Left Handedness


Right or left handedness is the tendency to use the right or left hand for everyday activities such as writing. About nine out of every ten people are right-handed.
Unlike left-handers, there has been no cultural pressure for right-handers to use their ‘wrong’ hand for activities such as writing and eating. The word ‘right’ has positive connotations. In many languages, the word left is synonymous to awkward, fake, insincere, causing suspicion. As a rule it is negative. In English left-handed means “clumsy”, “incompetent”, “ambiguous” and “doubtful”. French gauche means not only “left” but “dishonest.”
Most right-handers are left brain hemisphere-dominant. Most equipment nowadays is designed for right-handers. Most European writing goes from left to right. Right-handedness is common and ordinary.
There are more left-handers among men and there are a lot of left-handers among famous people: Alexander the Great, Joan of Arc, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Einstein, Charlie Chaplin, Alexander Pushkin, Nikola Tesla, Paul McCartney, Friedrich Nietzsche, Diego Maradona, Monica Seles, Fidel Castro, Mark Twain, Marilyn Monroe, Winston Churchill, Jimi Hendrix, Bill Gates, Queen Victoria, Nicolo Paganini, Leo Tolstoy and many others.
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Mysterious Ninja

Mysterious Ninja

Mysterious Ninja

The word ‘Ninja’ tends to conjure up images of black-clad assassins, moving silently through the night to bring pointy death to their unsuspecting victims.
Probably around 500-700AD, Nonuse was developed in Japan. Translated as ‘the art of stealth’, Nonuse was first practised in mystic form as a system of enlightenment and self-improvement. Nonuse was strictly nonviolent movement.
The word Ninja came into use later, and is based on the root nin, which is translated variously as ‘perseverance’, ‘stealth’, or ‘patience’, depending on context; and the Japanese kanji is also transliterated ‘shinobi’. Ninjutsu was the collective term for the Ninja fighting arts.
The true Ninja first began to appear with the rise of the military class in the Heian period (794-1185). Later landowners began to hire Samurai to protect their property and increase their power.
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Stupidity is dangerous

Stupidity is dangerous

Stupidity is dangerous


Working with idiots can kill you! Idiots are just as harmful to your health as cigarettes, caffeine or fast food. Stress is one of the top causes of heart attacks. Working with stupid people on a daily basis is one of the deadliest forms of stress.
You can give up smoking or improve your diet, but you may have very poor coping skills when it comes to stupidity.

5 laws of stupidity
Italian economic and historian Carlo Cipolla studied the nature of stupidity. Many years of research has led scientists to the formulation of five universal laws. It turned out that stupidity itself is much more dangerous than we used to think about it.
The first law of stupidity: Man always underestimates the number of idiots around him.
It sounds like snobbery, but life proves its truth. You will constantly face the following situations:
– A man, who always looked smart and rational, is an incredible idiot;
– Fools always appear in the most unexpected places at the wrong time, to disrupt your plans.
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History of telegraph

History of telegraph

History of telegraph


Telegraph was a wonderful instrument. Now it seems a fossil in the world of developed computer technologies. But when it was invented it was a real miracle. At first people would not believe that messages could possibly come over a wire. They waited until the mails brought the same news before they would believe it.
It was Samuel Morse who invented telegraph. He had studied both painting and sculpture and expected to earn his living as an artist. Morse tramped from town to town, painting portraits for a living for himself and his three children. However, he was thinking of different inventions. Once, Morse thought that messages could be sent by electricity and began working on his invention. He worked on it for twelve years. He also had to invent an alphabet to use in sending telegrams. It consisted of dots, dashes, and spaces.
“What hath God wrought!” was the first message sent by telegraph. By the end of the nineteenth century, most of the world was connected by telegraph lines. In 1842 Morse laid the first underwater conductor in New York Harbor.
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History of gymnastics

History of gymnastics

History of gymnastics


Gymnastics, as an activity, exists for more than two thousand years in one form or another, from the ancient Greek Olympics and Roman ceremony to today’s modern meets.
As an organized and truly competitive sport, gymnastics was introduced in the mid-1800s. Amateur associations gathered together by the late nineteenth century and began to have their own championships.
Gymnastics made its debut in 1896, at the first international Olympic Games in Athens, Greece. Vaulting, parallel bars, pommel horse, and rings events for men were included in the Olympic tournament. The first women’s Olympic gymnastics events were held in 1928.
In order to become successful at the sport of gymnastics, you will have to get into a routine of practice.
As a sport rhythmic gymnastics was formed in the Soviet Union in the postwar period. After the October revolution rhythm and plastic dance became very popular. So, plastic Dance Studio was established in 1923 in Petrograd. The teachers used the basics of “aesthetic gymnastics” by François Delsarte, “rhythmic gymnastics” by Emile Jacques Del Crozat and “free dance” by Isadora Duncan.
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