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Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Interesting history of pencil

Interesting history of pencil

Interesting history of pencil


Once, back in the Paleolithic era, a hunter unknown to us scratched the figures of people and animals with a sharp stone on the wall of the cave. The centuries passed … the writing appeared. Signs were carved on stones, painted on papyrus. In Assyria, the signs were written with a sharpened stick on the plates made of wet clay, which were then fired.
In the Middle Ages, people learned to write with pieces of lead with sharpened ends. Since the XIV century, artists in Europe used lead and tin, as well as silver pins for drawing. The great Botticelli made many of his drawings using such pins.
In the middle of the XVI century, English shepherds from Cumberland found a fairly soft and brittle mineral in the ground. The rocks were taken for the deposit of the lead because of the color.
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Fan – luxurious necessary thing

Fan - luxurious necessary thing

Fan – luxurious necessary thing


Fans were a sign of the wealth and authority of the owner.
The historians believe that the first fan appeared in China. Mentions of these things are found in the works of ancient Chinese poets, dating back to the second millennium BC. During the excavation of the grave of the principality of Chu fragments of fans made of feathers with a wooden handle were found. Similar findings refer to the Eastern Zhou Period (770-256 BC).
In the III century BC, Chinese fans had a semi-circular shape. They were made mainly of thin bamboo plates. Later, the masters began to make round paper fans on the handle. In the I century, the Chinese presented several such fans to the Japanese emperor.
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Amazing Belem Tower

Amazing Belem Tower

Amazing Belem Tower


This tower looks like a miniature castle. It was built in the era of the Portuguese King John II the Perfect Prince (1455-1495). The place for it was chosen on the bank of the Tagus River, which flows into the Atlantic Ocean. The bastion was not only a defensive structure which protected Lisbon from pirates and other uninvited guests, but also a lighthouse. The Portuguese navigators went on long journeys from there.
King Juan II planned to build multiple defensive structures on the bank of the Tagus River at the entrance to the port: two bastions on the right bank of the river and one on the left. Two of them were built during the life of the monarch, and construction of Belem had just begun.
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Interesting facts about Radio

Interesting facts about Radio

Interesting facts about Radio


Before there was television and Internet, people got much of their news and entertainment from the radio. Radio is a way of sending sounds or other information through the air. The information is carried by invisible radio waves. Radar, cell phones, cordless telephones, wireless computer networks also use this waves.
Radio waves are sent out by a transmitter, which turns talking, music, pictures, or other information into electric signals. The receiver separates the electric signals from the radio waves.
In the nineteenth century James Clerk Maxwell described the theoretical basis for radio transmissions. Heinrich Hertz demonstrated the existence of radio waves by transmitting and receiving a microwave radio signal over a considerable distance.
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Norway – Land of Fjords and Mountains

Norway - Land of Fjords and Mountains

Norway – Land of Fjords and Mountains


Norway is a country in northern Europe, part of Scandinavia. It shares borders with Sweden, Finland, and Russia. The Arctic Ocean lies to the north, and the Atlantic Ocean is to the west. The North Sea lies to the south. Its area is 324,220 square kilometers. Its official name is Kingdom of Norway.
Norway is covered with mountains and fjords. The longest and deepest fjord is Sogne Fjord. The two highest peaks are Galdhø Peak and Mount Glitter. Glaciers can be found in some mountain ranges. The country also contains more than 1,500 glaciers and the Jostedals Glacier is the largest in Europe.
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Cedar – Sweet-Smelling Wood

Cedar - Sweet-Smelling Wood

Cedar – Sweet-Smelling Wood


The cedar is an evergreen tree that grows in the mountains. They belong to the pine family. There are four kinds of cedar. Three of them originally grew only in the mountain areas of the Mediterranean. They later spread to other areas. The fourth kind grows in the Himalayas.
Cedars are tall trees with large trunks and huge heads of spreading branches. They can grow to a height of more than 30 meters. The leaves are stiff and needlelike. The tree also bears large barrel-shaped cones that are covered with woody scales. The cones hold the seeds.
Its wood has been used for building since ancient times, because it is light and soft and lasts for a long time. It has a pretty reddish color and a pleasant smell.
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Amphibian Man

Amphibian Man

Amphibian Man


Amphibian man is real or not? Can human beings become really amphibious, by adapting themselves to the ocean depths as other mammals have done? Is it possible for human beings to adapt themselves to breathing in water? There are a lot of questions and it seems impossible. However, scientists are studying this possibility.
Observations have shown that lungs can, in fact, absorb oxygen from water just as the fishes’ gills do. Water normally contains about seven cubic centimeters of oxygen per liter, which is enough for fish. To be breathed by animals, water must contain at least 10 times as much oxygen as it normally does.
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Basilisk – king of sand dunes

Basilisk - king of sand dunes

Basilisk – king of sand dunes


When the ancient Romans and Greeks appeared in the African desert for the first time, they looked at boundless barchans with astonishment and horror. The entire army could disappear there. Hundreds of miles of dead sand definitely had their master and patron. The ancient decided it was basilisk – king of the desert.
Now it is difficult to say who exactly was a prototype of the basilisk. Perhaps it was a small snake inhabiting the Libyan desert. It could attract the attention with its red “crown” and the way of moving. It moved almost vertically, standing on its own tail.
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Morocco – amazing country

Morocco – amazing country

Morocco – amazing country


Morocco is situated at the northwestern corner of Africa, along the Strait of Gibraltar. Its official name is Kingdom of Morocco. Its area is 446,550 square kilometers. Morocco shares land borders with the two Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla, Algeria, and the Western Sahara.
Morocco is the only country in Africa with coastlines on both the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.
The people of Morocco are mostly Arabs and Berbers. Arabic is the main language. Islam is the national religion.
Traders from the Middle East began arriving in North Africa more than 2,000 years ago. The Roman Empire controlled the region in the AD 300s. In 692 Arab armies arrived. From the 1000s to the 1200s Berber kingdoms ruled Morocco.
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Cabbage – Head of Vegetable Family

Cabbage - Head of Vegetable Family

Cabbage – Head of Vegetable Family

The cabbage group includes the common cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale, and collard. They are rich in vitamins and minerals and low in calories. People eat cabbage raw or cooked. Cauliflower has a head of tight thick white flowers. Broccoli has bright green loosely clustered flowers. Brussels sprout has many little cabbage-like heads. Kale and kohlrabi have loose leaves that spread outward from a stem.
The history of cabbage began in the prehistoric era, as evidenced by archaeological excavations of Stone Age man’s sites. For a long time people used wild cabbage. Later, as a result of the selection, several varieties of this plant were created, including the head cabbage.
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