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Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Category Archive: History

Fan – luxurious necessary thing

Fan - luxurious necessary thing

Fan – luxurious necessary thing


Fans were a sign of the wealth and authority of the owner.
The historians believe that the first fan appeared in China. Mentions of these things are found in the works of ancient Chinese poets, dating back to the second millennium BC. During the excavation of the grave of the principality of Chu fragments of fans made of feathers with a wooden handle were found. Similar findings refer to the Eastern Zhou Period (770-256 BC).
In the III century BC, Chinese fans had a semi-circular shape. They were made mainly of thin bamboo plates. Later, the masters began to make round paper fans on the handle. In the I century, the Chinese presented several such fans to the Japanese emperor.
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Jester – doomed to be a fool

Jester - doomed to be a fool

Jester – doomed to be a fool


All the monarchs of Europe had court jesters. They had to amuse the king and his guests. It was believed that the jester was an idiot who was allowed to do much of what was not allowed even to the king himself. In fact, the jester was the alter ego of the master. In a simple humorous and often allegorical form, he expressed the will of the lord. He also influenced the policy of monarchs. In Europe, the tradition of hiring jesters ended with the advent of the era of the Enlightenment and the Reformation.
We remember the kings and emperors, but undeservedly forget those who were not afraid of a sharp word, even if pretending to be a fool, to direct the rulers to the right path. Even the wise Khodja Nasreddin, as they say, was a jester of Tamerlane himself. Some of the court jesters were smarter than the kings themselves.
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Era of wigs

Era of wigs

Era of wigs


False hair has been a success in all ages. For a long time people used wigs to achieve different goals: to protect themselves from the sun, hide a bald patch or emphasize their status.
Because of the heat in Egypt, both men and women cut off their hair, but wore wigs, which appeared in the III millennium BC. Men wore short wigs. Women decorated their wigs with ribbons and multicolored threads. Pharaohs, their close associates, important officials and priests wore huge wigs made of natural hair. Landowners, warriors, merchants, peasants wore short wigs made of wool, feathers, palm or papyrus fibers, sea grass and linen threads. The wigs were fixed with beeswax. Black and dark brown wigs were common, although later orange, red, blue, green and yellow colors were used. Wigs were sprayed with aromatic oils and essences, sprinkled with flower petals and spices.
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Death in different cultures

Death in different cultures

Death in different cultures


Death marks the end of life. All living things go through the process of death, because it’s a natural process. Man is the only being who realizes the finiteness of his being.
Every culture has its own customs for dealing with death. Most customs include either burial or cremation of the body. Cemeteries are final resting places for the dead.
People have always been interested in what happens after death, but no one knows for certain.
In different cultures, in different parts of the world, the god of death was depicted in different ways, but all of these deities had similar features.
In the traditions and cultures of many peoples throughout the world, death is personified as a skeletal figure dressed in black.
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Ikebana – Flower Arrangement

Ikebana - Flower Arrangement

Ikebana – Flower Arrangement


Ikebana as an art formed about six centuries ago. Compositions began to be created by masters not only in temples, but also in the palaces of the emperor and the nobility for various events.
Japanese Ikebana (literally flowers kept alive) is a lot more complex than just flower arrangement. There are many schools and Ikenobo, Sogetsu and Ohara are the most popular.
Ikenobo is the oldest school of ikebana, founded by Buddhist priest Ikenobo Senkei in the 15th century. He is thought to have created the rikka (standing flowers) style. This style was developed as a Buddhist expression of the beauty of nature. The school is based in the Rokkakudo temple in Kyoto.
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Archery – ancient sport

Archery - ancient sport

Archery – ancient sport


Archery is the sport of shooting arrows with a bow at a target. For thousands of years people used the skills of archery mostly for war and for hunting.
A bow is a long, thin piece of wood with a string stretched tightly from one end to the other. An arrow is a long, thin piece of wood, which ends in a pointed tip. There is a tail of feathers or plastic fins on the other end of the arrow. It helps the arrow fly straight.
In the 1900s archery became an Olympic event. The Summer Olympic Games feature target archery events for men and women, individually and in teams.
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Interesting about Alphabet

Interesting about Alphabet

Interesting about Alphabet

An alphabet is a system used to represent language in written form. Each letter stands for a single spoken sound. Many languages use alphabets. In Japanese and Cherokee each symbol represents a group of sounds. In Chinese symbols represent the meaning of words, not their sounds.
People in early societies drew pictures to communicate ideas. The Phoenicians, who lived about 3,000 years ago in the Middle eastern country now called Syria, developed the first modern alphabet. However, it contained only consonants. Greek alphabet is considered the first true alphabet, because it contained both consonants and vowels. Greek alphabet is the ancestor of all modern European alphabets, including Latin. The ancient Romans developed the Latin alphabet. As the Roman Empire grew, the Latin alphabet spread throughout the empire’s vast lands.
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