Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Category Archive: History

Archery – ancient sport

Archery - ancient sport

Archery – ancient sport


Archery is the sport of shooting arrows with a bow at a target. For thousands of years people used the skills of archery mostly for war and for hunting.
A bow is a long, thin piece of wood with a string stretched tightly from one end to the other. An arrow is a long, thin piece of wood, which ends in a pointed tip. There is a tail of feathers or plastic fins on the other end of the arrow. It helps the arrow fly straight.
In the 1900s archery became an Olympic event. The Summer Olympic Games feature target archery events for men and women, individually and in teams.
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Interesting about Alphabet

Interesting about Alphabet

Interesting about Alphabet

An alphabet is a system used to represent language in written form. Each letter stands for a single spoken sound. Many languages use alphabets. In Japanese and Cherokee each symbol represents a group of sounds. In Chinese symbols represent the meaning of words, not their sounds.
People in early societies drew pictures to communicate ideas. The Phoenicians, who lived about 3,000 years ago in the Middle eastern country now called Syria, developed the first modern alphabet. However, it contained only consonants. Greek alphabet is considered the first true alphabet, because it contained both consonants and vowels. Greek alphabet is the ancestor of all modern European alphabets, including Latin. The ancient Romans developed the Latin alphabet. As the Roman Empire grew, the Latin alphabet spread throughout the empire’s vast lands.
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Interesting Dresdner Zwinger

Interesting Dresdner Zwinger

Interesting Dresdner Zwinger


The Saxon Elector Augustus the Strong was a great lover of court entertainments, he tried to imitate the French emperor Louis XIV and ordered to build palace ensemble Zwinger for mass festivities. The word “Zwinger” does not have an exact translation, in ancient times it meant the space between the inner and outer walls of the fortress.
Construction began from the central square of Dresden, next to the Elbe River. The walls were erected near the royal castle. So, Augustus could monitor the progress of building from his windows.
At first the walls were wooden, on the four sides they were joined by tribunes. And formed an elongated platform very convenient for the knights’ tournaments. Riders, chained in armor, fought with each other. The audience was delighted.
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Baalbek – ancient city

Baalbek – ancient city

Baalbek – ancient city


For the first time, scientists learned about Baalbek (its subsequent ancient name is Heliopolis) when they got acquainted with the Egyptian inscriptions of the epoch of Pharaoh Akhenaten. According to their assumptions, the history of this Phoenician city, which ruins have remained, goes back centuries, and most likely Baalbek was founded much earlier than two thousand years before our era. Today, the ruins of a once majestic city can be seen in the Beqaa Valley, at the foot of the Anti-Lebanon Mountains, 85 km northeast of Beirut.
Originally the city was called Baal Beck in honor of the ancient Phoenicians deity Baal – the god of sun and fertility. According to legend, this deity was the patron and protector of the Phoenicians, helped them in work and battles. Men of this city knew how to speak beautifully, and women were famous for their beauty.
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Great Golden Gate Bridge

Great Golden Gate Bridge

Great Golden Gate Bridge


People dreamed of the construction of the bridge across the Golden Gate Strait, which would connect San Francisco and Marin County, back in the XIX century. But only at the beginning of the XX century there were real technical possibilities for its construction. Engineer Joseph Strauss, developer of about 400 bridge structures, proposed to extend the suspension bridge with two supports over 2.5 km in length. People didn’t believe that it was possible to build such a bridge, but they became interested in the project.
Motorization in many ways accelerated the process of creating a bridge across the Golden Gate Strait. San Francisco grew rapidly, and the number of cars on the streets of the city increased.
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Suez Canal – Joining Two Seas for a Shortcut

Suez Canal - Joining Two Seas for a Shortcut

Suez Canal – Joining Two Seas for a Shortcut


The Suez Canal is one of the most important waterways that people have ever made. The idea to connect the Red and Mediterranean seas appeared in the Ancient World. Egyptian pharaoh Necho II (609-595 BC) tried to do it … and 120 thousand slaves died. Persian king Darius dug the canal from the Red Sea only to the Nile, as witnessed on the stone tablets. Later the canal was filled with sand.
The construction of this artificial 161-kilometer-long sea route also excited the French Emperor Louis XIV, and later Napoleon. The project, as the court advisers proved, promised considerable benefits. Merchant ships from the Indian Ocean could enter the Mediterranean, to the shores of France and further to the Atlantic Ocean. They would not have to go around Africa and the way would be 8-15 thousand km shorter. If the trade route connects the three continents – Asia, Africa and Europe, the one who owns the canal, becomes the richest man, will become the ruler of the world.
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Awesome Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius

Awesome Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius

Awesome Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius


Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius is 70 km to the north-east of Moscow on the southern slope of the Smolensk-Moscow Upland in the city of Sergiev Posad. It is famous not only in the religious world. It was founded in 1345 by Sergius of Radonezh, who was a spiritual leader and monastic reformer. A century later the monastery became widely known spiritual and cultural center of the Moscow principality.
He was called Bartholomew, his parents were the Rostov boyars Cyril and Maria. From his childhood he was reading holy books. As a boy he wanted to devote his life to the Orthodox Church. But eventually his parents became impoverished and in 1328 the family moved to the Pokrovsky Monastery in Khotkovo – one of the first monasteries that was built on the lands of the Moscow principality. There lived men and women at that time, but later it became a nunnery. His parents and elder brother diligently served God and were buried there.
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