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Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Mysterious Fog

Mysterious Fog

Mysterious Fog


Fog is tiny water drops hovering in the air. It is like a cloud on the ground. Thick fog makes it difficult to see the surrounding landscape.
Fog forms from water vapor, which turns back into liquid, when the air cools. A gentle wind helps fog to form and to stay in the air. It is very common in valleys and near bodies of water and usually forms at night. In the morning it disappears.
Water droplets in the fog have a size of only about 0.01 mm. A thick fog contains approximately 1200 drops per cubic cm.

In the Atacama Desert, which is located in Chile, since ancient times, droplets of fog were collected with stones that were arranged so that the water could drain into the interior. There it was protected from daylight. The same method was used in Egypt, where the collected water was stored underground.
Up to 40% of the water in the coastal forests of redwood was formed due to fog.
The Namibian beetle that lives in the desert collects water from the fog every morning. The hilly surface of this beetle’s shell helps to form water drops on the elytra, and then these drops flow into his mouth.
The foggiest place on the planet is Newfoundland (Canada), where fog is on average 120 days a year.
Mists may last for several days (mainly during the cold season).
There is a huge range of clouds along the coast of Chile, which rarely leads to rain, but creates a fog on the slopes and peaks of the mountains. A group of scientists developed a method for using these clouds as a source of water: the moisture contained in the fog is held by collectors resembling large volleyball nets. As the fog passes through the nets, water drops form on the cells. On average, such devices give the village 10,000 liters of water a day.

Mysterious Fog

Fog in paintings and photos