Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Category Archive: History

History of helicopter

History of helicopter

History of helicopter


Although developed after the airplane, the helicopter grew out of an idea that is several hundred years old. In the late Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci drew up a plan for such a flying machine. He made the first sketch of the helicopter with a brief description in 1489.
Three hundred years after Leonardo Mikhail Vasilyevich Lomonosov built the first model of the helicopter. It consisted of a fuselage and two screws rotate in opposite directions.
In the early 20th century experiments with vertical flight failed for lack of a powerful enough engine.
A French engineer named Paul Cornu designed and built a workable helicopter in 1907. It was powered by a 24-horsepower engine and actually flew for a few minutes. As a prototype it was interesting, but the design proved impractical, in subsequent years numerous other designers built helicopter-like machines. Some never got beyond the planning stage, while others flew for short periods.
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Wright brothers fly first motorized plane

Wright brothers fly first motorized plane

Wright brothers fly first motorized plane


Orville and Wilbur Wright were inspired by Otto Lilienthal, a German glider pioneer. Though he crashed to his death in 1896, the Wrights were obsessed by the technical problems involved in flight. They approached the issue methodically, working out ways to control a glider’s tendency to pitch up and down, roll side to side, or yaw left and right. By the third glider they built, they had solved most of these problems of steering and stability.
To make a self-powered airplane, they needed to develop a very light gasoline engine and an appropriate propeller. By December 1903, their first airplane (Flyer /, later renamed Kitty Hawk) was ready to test. It had a 12.3 meter wingspan, was 6.4 meters long, and weighed about 274 kilos without the pilot. It was powered by the Wrights’ home-made 12 horsepower gasoline engine. The Wrights returned to the site at Kill Devil Hill near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, where they had tested their gliders. Their selection of this spot was based on national weather records which showed it to have consistently favorable conditions.
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The Royal Pavilion

The Royal Pavilion

The Royal Pavilion

Brighthelmstone was a little fishing village in the mid-eighteenth century. Most of the people living there were very poor. Then Dr Richard Russell said that drinking or bathing in seawater was extremely good for you and Brighton’s seawater was the best of all! So, Brighthelmstone became Brighton, a fashionable seaside resort.
The most famous visitor to Brighton in those days was King George Ill’s son. George III suffered from mental illness for some periods of his life. In 1811 he became so ill that his son was made Prince Regent. Regency Period lasted from 1811 to 1820. George III died in 1820 and the Prince Regent became King George IV.
In 1787 George asked the architect Henry Holland to transform the farmhouse where he first stayed into what became known as The Marine Pavilion. In 1815 George chose the architect John Nash to design what we see today, the magnificent Royal Pavilion. John Nash designed it in an Indian style. However, the rooms in the palace are mainly in a Chinese style.
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Vikings – Men in Dragon Ships

Vikings - Men in Dragon Ships

Vikings – Men in Dragon Ships

The Vikings came from the three countries of Scandinavia: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The name ‘Viking’ comes from a language called Old Norse and means ‘a pirate raid’.
The Viking age in European history was from about 700 to 1100. Vikings left Scandinavia and travelled to other countries some to fight and steal treasure and others settled in new lands as farmers, craftsmen or traders.
The Vikings conquered England in 1013 under Sweyn I, whose son Canute was later crowned king of England, Denmark, and Norway. The City of Dublin was founded by none other than the Vikings in the ninth century.
After invading Russia, they moved far inland and mixed with the native people. The name of Russia comes from a Viking word.
The sight of a Viking ship was enough to strike terror into the hearts of people. Some people think that Viking warriors wore helmets with horns in battle. But there is no archaeological evidence.
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History of hula hoop

History of hula hoop

History of hula hoop


Children around the world have always played with hoops, by rolling and throwing them or twirling them around the waist and limbs. For adults, hoop twirling has at times been recommended as a weight-loss measure (ancient Greece) and, ironically, denounced as a source of sprains, pains and even heart attacks (14th-century England). These hoops were once made of vines or other plants, wood, or metal.
The conversion of the toy hoop into 20th-century Americana came thanks to Richard Knerr and Arthur “Spud” Melin, founders of the Wham-O Company. In 1957, an Australian visiting California told them offhand that in his home country, children twirled bamboo hoops around their waists in gym class. Knerr and Melin saw how popular such a toy would be; and soon they were winning rave reviews from schoolkids for the hollow plastic prototype they had created.
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Mastodon and mammoth

Mammoth

Mammoth

Thousands of years ago some elephants wore heavy fur coats. Actually, the mammoth was an ancestor of the modern elephant. And mastodons were distant relatives of the mammoth.
Scientists have found many frozen mammoth bodies, especially in the icy area of Russia, Siberia. The animals died out at the end of the last Ice Age, about 10,000 years ago.
Mastodons appeared about 20 million years ago. They were smaller than mammoths. The legs were short, massive, and like pillars. Mastodons were covered with long, reddish brown hair.
Mammoths were the size of modern elephants. They had small ears and very long tusks. Although they were large creatures, they fed on plants. They ate willow, fir, and the leaves from bushes. When their stomach contents were examined many different kinds of leaves were found.
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History of money

History of money

History of money


The word money comes from the name of the Roman goddess Moneta in whose temple silver coins were made.
One of the earliest forms of money was metal, such as gold or silver. In North America, Native Americans used beads made of shell, called wampum, as a form of money.
People invented money to avoid barter. The value of paper money and coins comes from an agreement between all people.
People have used money for more than 4,000 years. In the 600s BC the kingdom of Lydia in what is now Turkey began to make coins.
The first types of paper money were used in China more than 1,000 years ago.
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