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Wander Lord

Interesting on art, nature, people, history

Modest charm of Samovar

Modest charm of Samovar

Modest charm of Samovar


Today the samovar is out of date. Earlier the families had a wonderful tradition of tea drinking, when the whole family gathered together at the samovar. This amazing household item was in almost every family.
The samovar became a symbol of Russia, but it was not a national invention. Peter I brought it from Holland along with other curious things. Because of the cold climate the samovar became very popular in Russia. To keep warm, people drank 15-20 cups of tea a day! In addition, the samovar heated the room.
The first manufacturers of samovars in Russia were the Ural craftsmen. Then there were workshops in Yaroslavl, Moscow, St. Petersburg, Vologda, Kostroma. Tula, which received the status of the capital of the samovar, was the leader among them.

The first samovar workshop was created by the gunsmith Fedor Lisitsyn, and in 1778 his sons made the first samovar. In 1803 the workshop became a factory. The very first Russian factory, which received a foreign award for the samovars, was the factory of the Tula merchant Vasily Sergeevich Lomov. In 1836, at the Moscow Manufactory Exhibition, his samovars were awarded a silver medal, and after a while they were awarded the Order of the Lion and the Sun by Iranian government (Persia).
Initially, samovars were made from red copper and brass, and sometimes they were made from silver. The form of samovars was diverse – in Tula alone, about 150 species were produced. Sketches of these products were painted by famous artists and sculptors.
The samovar became not only the personification of the Russian way of life, but also the indicator of wealth.
In the late XIX – early XX century a kerosene samovar appeared. And after the events of 1917, the samovar industry practically ceased to exist. With the NEP the Tula samovars were made again. And then there was a lull until the end of World War II. In the 1950s, all the samovar factories of Tula were merged into one factory.
At the wedding of Sergei Yesenin and Isadora Duncan, held in the US, because of the Dry Law, cognac was served in samovars.
There are several museums of samovar: in Tula, Gorodets, in the village Suksun, Permsky Krai.
Samovar monuments are in many Russian cities. There are monuments to the samovar in Finland, Turkey, Iran.
The most expensive samovars are K. Faberge samovars.
Master of micro miniature Nikolai Aldunin made a samovar with a height of only 1.2 mm. It consists of 12 parts, and is made of gold.
The samovar can create an amazingly warm and cozy atmosphere at home, add a unique color to family dinners, recall the long-forgotten, but such pleasant Russian traditions.

Modest charm of Samovar

Monuments to samovar

Samovar in paintings